How to Cook Without a Book

Kalyn's picture

How to Cook Without a Book is literally changing my life.

Recipes are wonderful, but for years I have been awed by people who can meal-plan and cook from memory without spending hours poring over cookbooks. Most of the time, I don’t trust myself to properly make a pancake, much less prepare a roast, without slavishly finding and following a recipe. I have longed to gain the mysterious knowledge of ingredients and cooking techniques that seem to come so naturally to others.

In How to Cook Without a Book, Pam Anderson provides the answers I’ve been looking for. She equips her readers to cook everything from soups to sautés from heart. She teaches them how to keep a well-stocked fridge and pantry, and even provides memory rhymes that capture the central steps of each cooking technique.

I highly recommend this book to anyone longing for the freedom to cook from the heart instead of from a book. 

True Tales to be Told: Rockin' the Boat: 50 Iconic Rebels and Revolutionaries

We love to root for the underdog, and that is part of why we're drawn to the stories of revolutionaries. Whether they fail or succeed, people who can rally others to their cause and shake up the status quo tend to be inherently interesting. Rockin' the Boat tells the stories of 50 such legends throughout the world, from people fed up with the Roman Empire, to the revolutionaries who helped create America.

"Shine Shine Shine" by Lydia Netzer

Vita's picture

This debut novel centers around a woman born with no hair, her husband who is a prize winning robotics scientist and their autistic son.  As the characters work through a set of unusual circumstances, the main character is reminded that her quest for conventional American “normalcy” has eroded away the things that matter most to her.  This novel is beautifully written and reveals their story in surprising ways.  An extremely engaging book, it ultimately poses the question of whether autism is truly a disorder or an evolution of intellect and adaptation.

Crazy Good: The True Story of Dan Patch, the Most Famous Horse in America by Charles Leerhsen

Vita's picture

Similar to Laura Hilldebrand's Seabiscuit, Leerhsen's tale of Dan Patch is about a horse who loved to run. Few folks are familiar with trotter/pacer racing but a hundred years ago it was more popular than thoroughbred racing. Leerhsen’s story includes the social history of the Ragtime era, small Midwestern farmers, big city con men, and rise of the trotters and pacers popularity into the racing world. Crazy Good: The True Story of Dan Patch, the Most Famous Horse in America is truly an inspiring horse story of an underdog lame colt becoming a superstar champion in racing history. Good read!


@War: The Rise of the Military-Internet Complex, by Shane Harris

Caitlin's picture

America is at war—and so is Google, your bank, and America’s utility companies. At stake are financial data, military secrets, and innocent lives. Welcome to the strange and terrifying world of zero days, white hats, and hackbacks, where the NSA, internet security companies, major corporations, and foreign governments race to defend against swarms of botnets and ever-expanding worms. Shane Harris has written an absorbing account of the internet’s growing importance as not only the place where the world works, plays, and stores vital information, but the site of an ongoing covert war in which the lines between offense and defense are blurred—a war in which America does not have a clear advantage.

Washington: A Life By Ron Chernow

Scott's picture

The aspect of our politics has wonderfully changed since you left us”, wrote Thomas Jefferson about George Washington after America’s first president chose to retire at the end of his second term.  Jefferson did not stop with comments like that. During Washington’s second term in office, Jefferson had insinuated that America’s first and only unanimously-elected president was lucky and over-rated. The political intrigue between these two very different founding fathers is just one of many interesting facets of this compelling biography of George Washington.  The reader will learn about Washington’s ability to command undisciplined troops against a powerful British military, his influence in molding a new government, and all this against a backdrop of an on-going turbulent relationship with his mother. The nurturing of this new government was no easy task. During Washington’s second term, two political paradigms started taking shape. Washington pushed for a strong federal government while Jefferson led supporters for more states’ rights.  Sounds like 2015! 


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