Teachers

Picture Book Selection: Lizzie and the Last Day of School

Lizzie loves school: first pre-school, then kindergarten, and now it's the last day of first grade. While the other children and teachers are excited for summer vacation, Lizzie is sad. But a last minute turn of events makes for a happy ending, as both Lizzie and her teacher become involved in summer school. This book is a nice selection for reading aloud, and timely as the end of the school year approaches. Recommended for grades K-2.

Inspired by Bedtime Math? Read On...

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Back in November we gave away a copy of Bedtime Math, a book encouraging and providing fun ideas for parents and kids to share math at bedtime.

We all love to share stories at bedtime with our little ones as well, right? Why not do both? Did you know that here at UAPL we have a collection of books that incorporate math problems WITH narrative? You'll find a great selection in the 513 area of our non-fiction collection in the Youth department. Here are some suggestions to get you started:

 

Picture Book Selection: Maps

This collection of 52 detailed illustrated maps details not only geographical features and political borders, but also places of interest, iconic personalities, native animals and plants, local peoples, cultural events, and many more fascinating facts associated with each region of the world.  Recommended for Grades 1 and above.

Picture Book Selection: Blocks

This simple picture book teaches young children about colors and even more importantly, sharing!  Ruby has red blocks and Benji has blue blocks. They are both quite happy playing with them independently, until Benji takes one of Ruby's red blocks. In the tussle that follows, all the blocks come tumbling down. Now that they have both red and blue blocks, they realize they might be better off if they build together.  The conflict seems happily resolved until Guy comes with his green blocks! Recommended for PreK-K.

Teachers, mark your calendars!

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We are looking forward to all of the benefits of joining the CLC (Central Library Consortium) in a few weeks, and I know you will be as well! What will this mean for teachers? Check it out:

  • Much improved catalog! Many of our teachers have raised concerns over the years regarding our current catalog's lack of functionality when searching for materials. The catalog you will be using beginning in April will deserve an “A+”! Improved functions include automatic search suggestions, Novelist integration for item searches (Novelist provides Lexile scores for most print materials), and a more intuitive interface. You will be able to keep track of your search and borrowing history, and be notified when items of interest are added to the catalog. 
  • Access to more than 4 million items! Many of our teachers are looking for multiple copies of one title in order to share amongst many students. While we do have many duplicates of more popular items here at UAPL, such as Newbery winners, you will have access to many more duplicate items once we join CLC in April. Also, since you will have access to items carried at other CLC libraries, you will be able to reserve must-have items that we don't carry here at UAPL

Important things teachers need to know:

  • During our transition to CLC we will not be able to put together any Teacher Collections. We apologize for this inconvenience. We recommend that you prepare any unit needs now and request your Teacher Collections for completion before April 3rd. Teacher Collections cannot be completed between April 4th and April 9th. This means that Teacher Collections cannot be requested between 3/28 and April 10th, since they require 5 days to compile. 
  • Access to our catalog will be unavailable from 9 pm on April 3rd until 10 am on April 9th, so be sure to request items ahead of time to ensure you have what you need. 
  • We will be open during this transition time, so if you find that you need items while the catalog is unavailable, we encourage you to come on in and our staff will help you find items to satisfy your unit needs. 
  • One last but very important thing, you must bring your physical Teacher card in during these days if you want to check out any items. Be sure to come in before this time to replace any lost cards. 

Picture Book Selection: Elizabeth Started All the Trouble

Elizabeth started all the trouble. Elizabeth Cady Stanton wanted to end slavery. At a meeting held in London, England she discovered that because she was a woman, she was not allowed to speak, and only allowed to hear the discussion behind a curtain. The frustrations at this meeting started the 75-year struggle for women to have the right to have a voice, and to vote. Recommended by School Library Journal for Grades 1-4.  

Materials for Teachers!

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Hi teachers!  Did you know that we have a dedicated collection at the Main UAPL library just for you? It is called Educator Resources, and it is located in the Youth department near the juvenile non-fiction. The materials in this collection are useful for anyone dedicating their time to teaching children: traditional teachers, homeschoolers, preschool leaders, librarians, and parents. Here are three examples of what you can find here:

The New Social Story Book by Carol Gray (372.6 Ne). This is an amazing, yet simple book with 13 chapters of “Social Stories” that can be copied and turned into swatches. The content is intended to help teachers guide children and adults who are on the autistic spectrum with understanding and learning social and life skills. Examples of chapters include Learning to Chew Gum, Smiling, and even Escalators.

Teaching with Favorite Magic Tree House Books by Deborah and Frank Murphy (372.6 Ro). The Magic Tree House series is a great source for beginning a new Social Studies unit. This book will give you tips and activities to use for extending many of the titles from the series.

Incredible Edible Science by Liz Plaster and Rick Krustchinsky (372.35 Pl). In this book you will find loads of science activities for early learners that focus on observing, classifying, predicting, inferring, and more.

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