Parents

Parent Recommendation: Big Girls Go Potty and Big Boys Go Potty

Both of these books are told from a kid's point of view, and offer lots of encouragement on the subject of potty training.  An unnamed little girl speaks to the reader, asking about all the big girl things she can do. But, all is not perfect, and the magic of being toilet trained does not happen all at once. Mistakes happen, but mom and dad remain encouraging. These are very optimistic books, and will be useful in the training process.  Recommended for PreK

Make Your Own At-Home Storytime Kit: Egg Shakers

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Egg shakers are always a hit in storytime and at Sing-a-Story programs at Miller Park Library.  While you can buy egg shakers to use at home, you can also make your own out of various materials.  We made ours out of plastic eggs, beans, and plastic tape!  

Picture Book Selection: Good Morning Yoga

This book weaves gentle exercises with a heartwarming narrative and wonderful illustrations to empower children to manage the energies from the fiery volcano to the mountain quiet and still. By teaching to self-monitor, self-sooth, focus and relax, children are given the skills to jumpstart the day with energy and excitement and meet the adventures that come with mindfulness and perspective. Ages 0-8.
  

Ready, Set, Go Outside!

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Ready, Set, Go Outside!

Believe it or not, summer is here. Fight the “summer slide” by joining the UA Library’s Summer Library Club. There’s a club for everyone in your family – babies to adults!  

Check out these books for tons of outdoor fun you can use to fulfill the activities requirement.

Juvenile Nonfiction Selection: Presidential Pets

A look at the Presidents of the United States through the pets that accompanied them to the White House. A lyrical, often humorous poem describes the pets as each is brought to life by a cartoon style picture. Includes interesting presidential facts, accomplishments, and events. Would make a great read-a-loud as the pictures, poems, and facts make it fun and accessible for a range of ages.(Ages: 2nd - 5th)

Check out these award winners!

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Yesterday, the American Library Association announced the winners of the best children’s and teen books published in 2013.   Copies of all these wonderful books can be reserved in our catalog.

If you like well-illustrated books, check out the Caldecott winner, “Locomotive” by Brian Floca. 

The Newbery award for outstanding writing went to “Flora & Ulysseys: the illuminated adventures” by Kate DiCamillo.

Parrots Over Puerto Rico” by Susan L. Roth was recognized with the Robert F. Sibert Informational Award.

Beginning readers should check out “Watermelon Seed” by Greg Pizzoli, the winner of the Theodore Seuss Geisel Award.

For the complete listing of awards, their winners, and honor books, visit ALA’s website. (http://www.ala.org/news/press-releases/2014/01/american-library-association-announces-2014-youth-media-award-winners)

Caldecott Award Contenders

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The Caldecott Medal was named in honor of nineteenth-century English illustrator Randolph Caldecott. It is awarded annually by the Association for Library Service to Children, a division of the American Library Association, to the artist of the most distinguished American picture book for children.

Below are some books that the Youth Services staff have chosen as possible contenders for the 2017 Caldecott Medal. Will one of these be the winner? Stay tuned for the announcement from the American Library Association on Monday, January 23! 

Check out the UAPL Pinterest site for even more staff picks: https://www.pinterest.com/uapubliclibrary/

Looking for Lexile?

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Hi parents! Since the introduction of the new Common Core, Youth staff at the library have experienced an increase in questions from parents about Lexiles. Specifically, parents are seeking books that match a specific Lexile to support their child's reading progress. However, through this we have also learned that many parents aren't completely familiar with how Lexile works, so below is a general overview, and how we can help you!

What is Lexile?  A Lexile measurement is determined when a child takes a reading assessment test, usually through school. A child (and parent) usually receive a specific number from his or her teacher. 

What does the Lexile number for a book really mean? A Lexile measurement for a book is simply an evaluation of the vocabulary and sentence length in the book. Lexile does not take into account the complexity, quality of writing, or age-appropriateness of a book. For example, the book Between Shades of Gray by Ruta Sepetys is an award-winning, highly acclaimed teen book about the histocial account of a 15 year old girl who was sent to a Siberian prison camp in 1941; it measures at a 490 Lexile. Compare that to a fun picture book called Chicken Cheeks, an illustrated preschool book about different animal behinds, which measures at a 1080 Lexile. The higher the lexile, the more complex the vocabulary and sentence structure, and that is all.  

 What can I do with that number? Now that your child's Lexile has been determined, your first instinct is to find leveled books, right? My favorite go-to source to find books within a Lexile range is Novelist. We provide this database through our website–if you want to access this from home you will need to use your library card. To search by Lexile, go to the Advanced Search field link right below the search area–within this page you can limit your search for materials to within a Lexile range. Although it's database of materials is much more limited, you can also use the Lexile website itself to find materials. Also, here is a guide about levels; this guide will provide you with more info about different leveling systems. And, of course, you can always ask a staff member for guidance!

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