Parents

Looking for Lexile?

Dena's picture

Hi parents! Since the introduction of the new Common Core, Youth staff at the library have experienced an increase in questions from parents about Lexiles. Specifically, parents are seeking books that match a specific Lexile to support their child's reading progress. However, through this we have also learned that many parents aren't completely familiar with how Lexile works, so below is a general overview, and how we can help you!

What is Lexile?  A Lexile measurement is determined when a child takes a reading assessment test, usually through school. A child (and parent) usually receive a specific number from his or her teacher. 

What does the Lexile number for a book really mean? A Lexile measurement for a book is simply an evaluation of the vocabulary and sentence length in the book. Lexile does not take into account the complexity, quality of writing, or age-appropriateness of a book. For example, the book Between Shades of Gray by Ruta Sepetys is an award-winning, highly acclaimed teen book about the histocial account of a 15 year old girl who was sent to a Siberian prison camp in 1941; it measures at a 490 Lexile. Compare that to a fun picture book called Chicken Cheeks, an illustrated preschool book about different animal behinds, which measures at a 1080 Lexile. The higher the lexile, the more complex the vocabulary and sentence structure, and that is all.  

 What can I do with that number? Now that your child's Lexile has been determined, your first instinct is to find leveled books, right? My favorite go-to source to find books within a Lexile range is Novelist. We provide this database through our website–if you want to access this from home you will need to use your library card. To search by Lexile, go to the Advanced Search field link right below the search area–within this page you can limit your search for materials to within a Lexile range. Although it's database of materials is much more limited, you can also use the Lexile website itself to find materials. Also, here is a guide about levels; this guide will provide you with more info about different leveling systems. And, of course, you can always ask a staff member for guidance!

Parents' Book Selection: Good Night Owl

In this delightful picture book, Owl is just settling in for bed when he hears a noise.  Until he finds out where the noise is coming from, he'll never be able to fall asleep!  Children will have fun joining Owl on his humorous journey around the house to locate the source of the noise.  This is the kind of story that makes a great read aloud for parent and child.  You won't be disappointed!  Recommended for grades Prek-2

It's Time for a Picnic!

Stephanie's picture

picnic basket wikicommonsIt's Summer! It's picnic time. Time to be outside and enjoy all of the wonders of the season. Time to have a picnic in the park, in the backyard, at the pool, and maybe even combine it with a concert in the park.  And even better you can count these activities on your Summer Library Club reading log!  Be sure to check our Pinterest boards for ideas to make your summer healthy and interesting!

Picnic books for ages 2 and up:

Picnic Books for ages 5 and up

Bon Appetit!

Inspired by Bedtime Math? Read On...

Dena's picture

Back in November we gave away a copy of Bedtime Math, a book encouraging and providing fun ideas for parents and kids to share math at bedtime.

We all love to share stories at bedtime with our little ones as well, right? Why not do both? Did you know that here at UAPL we have a collection of books that incorporate math problems WITH narrative? You'll find a great selection in the 513 area of our non-fiction collection in the Youth department. Here are some suggestions to get you started:

 

Books for Bedtime

Stephanie's picture

sleeping catSleep!  Everyone needs it, but it is not always easy for kids to want to go to sleep. According to the CDC, school-aged children need 10-12 hours of sleep a night. Many times the right bedtime book can make even the twitchiest child relax, and maybe even welcome sleep. Try the recommendations below for some sweet dreams!

 

For the youngest listener:

  • Cuddle up, Goodnight by Katie Cleminson. The routines of the day in a simple rhyme with sweet illustrations.
  • Dream Animals by Emily Martin. In this beautifully illustrated book kids play in their dreams with their favorite animals.
  • Goodnight Moon by Margaret Wise Brown. Reading this out loud will make you realize why this classic is still in print!

Quiet bedtime picture books:

  • Bedtime Bunnies by Wendy Watson.  All the things little bunnies do to get ready for bed.
  • The Cloud Spinner by Michael Catchpool.  A greedy king, a talented boy, and clothes from the clouds.
  • Dr. Seuss' Sleep Book This classic counts all of the beings in the world that are going to sleep.
  • How Does Sleep Come? by Jeanne Blackmore.  A boy questions his mother about the arrival of sleep.
  • Niccolini's Song by Mary Wilcoxen.  The nightwatchman puts the trains to sleep with a gentle song.
  • Sleep Like a Tiger by Mary Logue.  Does everything in the world go to sleep at night?

Chapter Book Read-alouds:

  • My Father's Dragon by Frank Gannett.  A young boy determines to rescue a poor baby dragon who is being used by a group of lazy wild animals to ferry them across the river on Wild Island.
  • The Mysterious Howling by MaryRose Wood.  Fifteen-year-old Miss Penelope Lumley, a recent graduate of the Swanburne Academy for Poor Bright Females, is hired as governess to three young children who have been raised by wolves and must teach them to behave in a civilized manner quickly, in preparation for a Christmas ball.  
  • The Night Fairy by Laura Schlitz.  When Flory the night fairy's wings are accidentally broken and she cannot fly, she has to learn to do everything differently.
  • Toys Go Out by Emily Jenkins. Six stories relate the adventures of three best friends, who happen to be toys. 

 

 

Juvenile Book Selection: The Misadventures of the Family Fletcher

The Fletchers have their hands full – 2 dads, 4 boys, a cat, a dog, (eventually) a kitten and a turtle, imaginary friends, and a very grumpy neighbor! But, not to fear: this loveable family faces everything together and works through all their growing pains, friendships, and hectic schedules with humor, patience, love, support, and, when necessary, notes! Makes a great read-a-loud or Audiobook to listen to for the whole family. And don't miss the continuing adventures in The Family Fletcher Takes Rock Island. (Ages: 3rd - 6th)

Happy Fourth of July!

Lauren's picture

July is almost upon us! Which means the annual Upper Arlington Fourth of July Parade is right around the corner. If you'd like to be a part of all the good cheer, come to our annual Red, White, and Bikes! program. On Friday, July 1st, 2 p.m. - 3 p.m, all of your Upper Arlington Library locations will be providing a variety of decorations to make your bikes sparkle! If you'd like to ride your bike in the parade, the bike riders will meet at the corner of Zollinger and Northwest Blvd at 8:30 A.M. There is no age limit, so please feel free to bring a parent or guardian. And don't forget your helmet and a water bottle!!

The library staff will be marching in the parade, so please make sure to wave and give us a little cheer! Have a safe and happy Fourth of July!

 UAPL Staff July 4th 2015

Parent Recommendation: What a Beautiful Morning

Watching a relative change because of dementia or Alzheimer's is a difficult thing to understand. In this book, Noah loves visiting his grandparents and especially spending time with Grandpa and he doesn't understand when Grandpa begins to forget things and can no longer do simple tasks like cutting his toast. This is a tender story about change and loss and is suitable for sharing one on one or in a group.  Recommended for PreS-gr. 2

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