Teens

Babysitting 101: How To Make Extra Cash This Summer

Youth Department's picture

Have you ever wondered what it would be like to be your own boss? Do you want to take control of your own finances? Babysitting can be a very rewarding and profitable. However, there are a few things you need to know before you can start handing out your business cards. How do you change a diaper? What happens if there is an emergency? How can you get your name out there? What if the kids start fighting? Don't panic! The UAPL is here to help. You can find the answers to these questions, and so many more in the books below!

Want more? We also have many fiction books about adventures in babysitting. Check out:

Teen novels set in Ireland

Dena's picture

Happy St. Patrick's Day! To further enjoy this day of green, here are a few award-winning Teen novels set in Ireland:

Ashes of Roses by Mary Jane Auch

Ashes of Roses by Mary Jane Auch

 

The Nolan family's dreams of prosperity in a new country are shattered when baby Joseph fails the medical exam at Ellis Island and must be taken back to Cork by his father. Though Da promises a quick return, Ma is miserable. Frustrated by her dependence on the unwilling hospitality of prosperous relatives, she gladly accepts money from her brother-in-law for herself and her three daughters to return home. Having few opportunities in Ireland, 16-year-old Rose rebels and she and 12-year-old Maureen are allowed to remain in New York to seek work and schooling. (School Library Journal, vol 48, issue 5, p146)

 

The Carnival at Bray by Jessie Anne Bray

 

It’s the eve of 1994, and the grunge movement has reached its fevered height. On Ireland’s east coast, 16-year-old Maggie, disgruntled and displaced from her native Chicago, after her flighty mother’s recent marriage, listens to Nirvana and misses the uncle in America who snuck her into rock concerts. Her plan is to keep her head down and wait for her mother’s relationship to implode, but she finds herself drawn into her new town of Bray and its generations of inhabitants. When her first real loss comes on the heels of her first love, she undertakes a pilgrimage to the mecca of grunge music: a Nirvana concert in Rome. (Booklist review, vol 111, number 13)

Zom-B by Darren Shan

In the first of a 12-book series, Shan introduces B, an 11-year-old antihero living in Britain. B’s gang of hooligans are going about their routine—cursing, stealing, fighting, drinking, and haranguing the weak—when news reports filter in about a zombie outbreak in Ireland. Despite grainy video clips, no one is sure if these are hoaxes or the real deal. (Booklist, vol 109, number 4, p50)

 

Funny Fiction: Dodger

In an alternative version of Victorian London, seventeen-year-old Dodger, a cunning and cheeky street urchin, unexpectedly rises in life when he saves a mysterious girl, meets Charles Dickens, and unintentionally puts a stop to the murders of Sweeney Todd. 

For Teen Fantasy Fiction Lovers: Lark Rising

Shy, sixteen-year-old Lark is happiest close to home, tending her garden and gathering herbs for medicines. When Lark has visions that warn her that monsters called Troths will soon invade her village, she is summoned on a journey to seek help from the legendary Riders of Tarnec. The journey will make her visions reality and bring her closer to knowing her inner strength.  

Don't miss Calvin and Hobbes!

Youth Department's picture

Calvin and Hobbes fans will delight at the current exhibit of Bill Watterson's beloved cartoon! Check it out at the Billy Ireland Cartoon Library & Museum at Sullivant Hall, 1813 N. High Street (on the OSU campus).

Bill Watterson began tossing around the idea of his cartoon strip about the adventures of a six year old boy and his stuffed toy tiger, while working at a job he despised.  His first strip appeared on November 18, 1985 and became an instant hit featured in over 2400 newspapers, worldwide. Ten years later, much to his fans' dismay, Mr. Watterson wrote his final Calvin and Hobbes strip, leaving to pursue other interests. 

Enjoy this recent interview with the artist, Bill Watterson. 

Teen Fiction for when you need to cope with life

Stephanie's picture

Every so often I serendipiously read fiction that has similar themes.  Recently I have been reading some great fiction from 2015 that talk about mental issues.  It could be OCD, anxiety, depression, and dealing with family drug abuse, and or suicide.  Every year seems to bring newer stresses to our lives. Sometimes it is hard to deal with yourself in the world.  Whether you are experiencing some of these issues, or trying to be supportive of friends and family in these situations, try these stories for some bibliotherapy.

every last word tamara stone

Every Last Word by Tamara Stone  Samantha is part of the popular crowd in her school, but she has a secret she keeps from them.  She has purely-obsessional OCD.

All the Bright Places by Jennifer Niven  Told in alternating voices, when Theodore Finch and Violet Markey meet on the ledge of the bell tower at school–both teetering on the edge–it's the beginning of an unlikely relationship, a journey to discover the “natural wonders” of the state of Indiana, and two teens' desperate desire to heal and save one another.

Mosquitoland by David Arnold  After the sudden collapse of her family, Mim is dragged from her home in Ohio to the “wastelands” of Mississippi.  When she learns that her mother is sick in Ohio, Mim confronts her demons on a thousand-mile odyssey from “mosquitoland” to her Ohio mother that redefines her notions of love, loyalty, and what it means to be sane.

 

 

For more bibliotherapy:

  • It's Kind of a Funny Story by Ned Vizzini = A humorous account of time spent in a psychiatric hospital.
  • OCD Love Story by Cory Ann Haydu = Almost normal relationship between 2 people with OCD
  • Everybody Sees the Ants by A.S. King  = Learning to cope with bullying and family drama
  • Lost in the Sun by Lisa Graff = Lots of anger management and dealing with things out of your control
  • The Carnival at Bray by Jessie Ann Foley= Dealing with suicide and poor family decision making
  • Crazy by Amy Reed = An honest portrayal of bipolar disorder

Funny Teen Fiction: Croak

Fed up with her wild behavior, sixteen-year-old Lex's parents ship her off to upstate New York to live with her Uncle Mort for the summer, hoping that a few months of dirty farm work will whip her back into shape.  Uncle Mort is not a farmer, but actually a Grim Reaper and he's going to teach Lex the family business.  

Teen Fiction from the ages: Tangled Webs

London, 1725. Everybody has a secret. Lady A will keep yours—for a price. Lady A is a seventeen-year-old orphan named Arista who trades in secrets and lives in fear of her abusive master.  To escape this life she has to pass herself off as a boy to move safely through London's criminal underworld. Everything changes when she meets Grae Sinclair, who loves Arista for who she is and promises to help her escape her criminal life.

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