Big Kids

It's a Fact: Amazing Eyes

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MarmosetDid you know that not every kind of animal has the same type of eyes?   Tigers can see six times better at night than humans.  Owls are the only birds that can see the color blue.  Most hamsters only blink one eye at a time. And, worms have no eyes at all!  Learn about all the unique and interesting types of eyes in Animal Eyes by Mary Holland and Eye to Eye: How Animals See the World by Steve Jenkins.  If your interested in your own eyes, check out Eye: How It Works by David Macaulay.

Just for fun, try tricking your eyes with some books about optical illusions – What in the World: Fun-Tastic Photo Puzzles for Curious Minds by Julie Vosburgh Agnone and X-Treme Illusions by National Geographic Kids.  You can even learn how to make your own optical illusion!

It's Fall: Let's Talk about Costumes

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boy in red lego costume

Halloween is such a fun time, with dressing up and having parties and candy.  Is your costume ready? Are you having a hard time deciding what you want to be?  Everyone picks their favorite character from tv shows, but why not try a favorite book character?  Will you be funny, spooky or magical?  Here are some ideas for those undecided.    

You could be: 

Be sure to check our Pinterest boards for other fall activity and costume/cosplay ideas.  

Juvenile Fiction Selection: Courage for Beginners by Karen Harrington

Mysti Murphy is starting seventh grade and so far nothing is turning out as expected.  Her best friend Anibal Gomez has blown her off to become a “hipster” and gain the attention of a pretty girl at school.  Meanwhile, Mysti has plenty of problems at home.  Her family has a secret; her mother is agoraphobic which means she never leaves the house.  Mysti and her sister keep this secret and their father takes care of everything that needs to be done outside of the house.  Things take a bad turn when her father falls and suffers an injury that lands him in the hospital for a long stay.  Now it is up to Mysti to move beyond her mother's projected fears and find the courage to help herself and her family.  With the loss of her best friend Mysti ends up at the “loser island” lunch table and eventually befriends a strong and sassy Rama Khan who helps her find that courage.  Mysti is a character that you'll be rooting for from beginning to end!  (Grades 5-8 School Library Journal)

Check out these award winners!

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Yesterday, the American Library Association announced the winners of the best children’s and teen books published in 2013.   Copies of all these wonderful books can be reserved in our catalog.

If you like well-illustrated books, check out the Caldecott winner, “Locomotive” by Brian Floca. 

The Newbery award for outstanding writing went to “Flora & Ulysseys: the illuminated adventures” by Kate DiCamillo.

Parrots Over Puerto Rico” by Susan L. Roth was recognized with the Robert F. Sibert Informational Award.

Beginning readers should check out “Watermelon Seed” by Greg Pizzoli, the winner of the Theodore Seuss Geisel Award.

For the complete listing of awards, their winners, and honor books, visit ALA’s website. (http://www.ala.org/news/press-releases/2014/01/american-library-association-announces-2014-youth-media-award-winners)

Super Power Saturdays - Juvenile Nonfiction: All Kinds of Heroes

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Book Cover for Superstars of History by R. J. GrantWelcome to our last month of Super Power Saturdays. So far we have explored a lot of super powers and heroes throughout juvenile books. We've looked at superpowers in fiction in the post What's Your Power?, super powers in graphic novels in Graphic Novels: All Kinds of Powers!, and we explored the unique powers of middle schoolers in Middle School Powers!. But, superheroes and super powers are not limited to fiction. There are real life heroes out there doing amazing things everyday.So, this week's post highlights real life heroes in nonfiction books. Some of these heroes include: animal heroes, first ladies and leaders, explorers and adventurers, inventors, comic book creators, and even everyday children and teens from across the world making a difference. To learn more about these everyday heroes check out some of these picks:

For a list of these and other juvenile nonfiction books about heroes check out the Juvenile NonFiction: All Kinds of Heroes book list in our catalog.

And don't forget to check back in two weeks for our last post in the Super Power Saturdays series where we will feature books that can help you create your own superheroes, graphic novels, and stories in the post Creating Your Own Superheroes and Graphic Novels.

Happy “Super Powered” Reading!

 

Young Adult selection: Recreated

In this sequel to Reawakened by Colleen Houck, Lily, a high-school senior, continues her adventure and romance with Amon,an Egyptian mummy, who was reawakened in the first book in order to protect humanity.  In the opening of this sequel, Anon has hidden himself in the netherworld and Lily must save him.  In order to save him, she has to become a sphinx.  In order to do this, she melds both mind and body with a lioness named Tia.  She faces countless other trials throughout the journey, including wonderfully awful creatures such as giant grubs and wasp-esque reapers. The final battle with the demon Devourer is thrilling.  Grades 9-12.

Vacation! Home or Away?

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School is almost out for the summer!  HOORAY!  Many families decide to start the summer break somewhere far away, perhaps at the beach, or in the mountains.  There are still others who decide to have a “stay-cation”.   Try these favorites for your summer reading!

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