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Juvenile Fiction Selection: A Handful of Stars by Cynthia Lord

In this new book by Cynthia Lord we meet Lily, a young girl who lives with her grandparents near the shore and blueberry barrens of Maine. Lily's summer is just starting and she is feeling a little lost since her and her best friend Hannah have started growing apart. While out walking, her blind dog Lucky slips from his leash and runs across the blueberry barrens and it is a girl named Salma who catches him, using her sandwich as bait. Immediately a friendship begins to bloom between Lily and Salma, the daughter of a migrant family living in town for the blueberry-picking season. Salma and Lily spend the summer painting bee houses in Lily's grandparents' store and are growing even closer when Hannah starts coming around again. Hannah is the reigning Blubbery Queen and sparks an interest in Salma to compete in the local annual pageant. Together the girls help to get Salma ready for the pageant and all learn a few things about friendship and belonging along the way. This is a wonderful summer read for realistic fiction fans!  (Grades 4-6 School Library Journal)

The Devil's Intern

Humor, suspense, and time-travel ensure a good time when you read The Devil's Intern by Donna Hosie. It's been four years since 17-year old Mitchell Johnson was hit by a bus and ended up in the Underworld.  It's not as bad as you may think though.  He's made friends and even has a job as The Devil's intern.  But, when he finds a time-travel device, he and his friends decide to use it to revisit the circumstances of their own deaths.

Picture Book Selection: Salsa

In this new cooking poem, Jorge Argueta brings us a fun and easy recipe for a yummy salsa. A young boy and his sister gather the ingredients and grind them up in a molcajete, just like their ancestors used to do, singing and dancing all the while. In English and Spanish. Ages 4-7.

Picture Book Selection: Douglas, You Need Glasses

Douglas is a sweet little dog whose nearsightedness often gets him in trouble.  He chases leaves that he thinks are squirrels, misses safety signs like “wet cement”, and sometimes goes home to the wrong house!  Finally, his owner, Nancy, takes him to the eye doctor, where he gets his first pair of glasses.  Kids who wear glasses, as well as kids who don't will enjoy this funny story. Recommended for PreS-Gr. 2.

Juvenile Fiction Selection: Squirrel in the House

Squirrel lovers will enjoy this humorous story about Squirrel and a dog named Cuddles.  One winter night, Squirrel gets cold and decides to visit Cuddles's house.  The two get into mischief and end up leaving the holiday decorations in shambles.  A young human is blamed and as a result, he runs outside where he hurts himself.  There's a blizzard coming and it is up to Squirrel and Cuddles to save the boy and make amends.  This funny story is told in short chapters and will be enjoyed by young readers.  Recommended for grades 2-4.

Battle Ready: Memoir of a SEAL Warrior Medic

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Mark L. Donald joined the U S Marines straight out of high school as a way to escape his abusive father and avoid trouble with neighborhood gangs.  Given the work ethic installed by his mother and an innate competitive sense, he quickly earned a position on a Reconnaissance Team, the equivalent of a Navy Seal or Army Green Beret.  During the extensive training required for this team, he observed the Navy Hospital Corpsmen HM1 at work, and realized that this was what he was truly meant to do.  The story of his transition to a Navy HM1, during the Persian Gulf and Afghanistan War makes for a gripping read.  This book gives a great inside look at life on the battlefield and the devotion required of a true soldier.

Secret History of Wonder Woman

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Jill Lepore writes a story rich in historical detection about the most popular female superhero of all time while revealing a fascinating family story and history of twentieth-century feminism.

Wonder Woman was created in 1941 by William Moulton Marston.  Marston's life was greatly influenced by early suffragists, starting with Emmeline Pankhurst, and including Olive Byrne and Margaret Sanger.  Marston and Byrne wrote a regular column for “Family Circle “celebrating conventional family life, even as they themselves pursued lives of extraordinary nonconformity.  Marston’s other claim to fame —-he invented the lie detector test.

  

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