Teens @ UAPL

Our 2014 Teen Fiction Picks!

Stephanie's picture

Bratislava fireworks

To celebrate another great year of reading here at UAPL each of us at Tremont picked one novel that we loved from this year.  

dena I'll give you the sun

Dena picked: I'll Give You the Sun by Jandy Nelson

A story of first love, family, loss, and betrayal told from different points in time, and in separate voices, by artists Jude and her twin brother Noah.

dana the strange and beautiful sorrows

Dana: The Strange and Beautiful Sorrows of Ava Lavender by Leslye Walton

This debut novel weaves magical realism through generations of a family to tell a beautiful tale of love and loss.  

jennifer teen

Jennifer could not decide and picked two!

  • A Beautiful Friendship by David WeberTwelve-year-old Stephanie Harrington, a genetically-enhanced girl, moves to the pioneer planet of Sphinx, and is in danger from highly placed enemies who want to ensure that the planet remains entirely in human hands.
  • Relativity by Cristin BisharaRuby Wright discovers a tree in the middle of an Ohio cornfield with a wormhole to nine alternative realities. Is there such a thing as a perfect world? What is Ruby willing to give up to find out?

tracie snow like ashes

Tracie's Pick: Snow Like Ashes by Sara Raasch

Orphaned Meira, a fierce chakram-wielding warrior from the Kingdom of Winter, must struggle to free her people from the tyranny of an opposing kingdom while also protecting her own destiny.

katie starbird murphy

Katie: Starbird Murphyand the World Outside  by Karen Finneyfrock

Starbird has spent the first sixteen years of her life on a commune in the woods of Washington State. When she gets her Calling to become a waitress at the farm's satellite restaurant in Seattle, it means leaving behind the only place she's ever known and entering the World Outside.

laura tin star

Laura: Tin Star by Cecil Castellucci

Beaten and left for dead, fourteen-year-old Tula Bane finds herself abandoned on a space station called Yertina Feray after traveling with the colonist group, Children of the Earth.

stephanie love letters to the dead

Stephanie: Love Letters to the Dead by Ava Dellaria

Laurel starts writing letters to famous dead people for a school assignment, but it soon becomes a way to deal with the loves and losses in her life.  

Sue with the Night GardenerSue: The Night Garderner by Jonathan Auxier

Two orphans travel to England to work as servants in a  manor house which they soon discover is cursed.

Sarah holds We Were Liars Sarah: We Were Liars  by

E. Lockhart

Spending the summers on her family's private island off the coast of Massachusetts with her cousins and a special boy named Gat, teenaged Cadence struggles to remember what happened during her fifteenth summer.

From all of us have a Happy Reading New Year 2015 everyone!

Your New Year's Reading Resolutions

Katie's picture

Are you sick of hearing about how people are going to stop eating sweets in the New Year?  Or maybe they resolve to be less lazy.  Perhaps this will be the year that your brother finally kicks that bad habit of biting his nails.

This year, instead of focusing on what you DON'T want to do, why not make a resolution that encourages you to explore the world, discover new things, and increase your brain activity! Reading is a great New Year's resolution that helps you push yourself to grow, learn, and live more in the New Year.

How do you make a resolution about reading, you ask?

1.  There are lots of lists available online. A great site for different types of booklists can be found on List Challenges. If you're a Gilmore Girls Fan, they have the Rory Gilmore Reading Challenge. Or if you think you want to be an English major in college, you can always look at the English Student Book Challenge. Make it your New Year's Resolution to read 20 books on that list.  More or less is fine–pick what works for you!

2.   Goodreads, a website that allows you to keep track of the books you read, also has a yearly book challenge. You can challenge yourself to read a certain number of books. Remember it's always helpful to make a reading list that has a reasonable goal. It is not likely that you will be able to read 500 books next year unless you are reading more than one book a day. Maybe start with 24. That is two books a month. If you finish your goal early, you can always raise your goal at that time. Goodreads also has great lists to look at to draw inspiration. You can even see what your friends (and librarians) are reading!

3. If you are looking to expand your reading repertoire, POPSUGAR has an awesome reading list that has items like: a book by a female author, a book that scares you, a book set somewhere you've always wanted to visit. The list goes on! You can even count one book for more than one category if you'd like. It's a fun way to read something you'd never thought of reading before.

What's your reading resolution? We'd love to hear from you!

December Teen Reads

Tracie's picture

This is a guest blog, by Eileen F., a local high school student and summer intern here at the UAPL.  Eileen recommends several reads for teens for December.

December is finally here! The holiday season is kicking into high gear and all the teens out there  are probably counting down the days until winter break. With winter break comes free time,  and what better way to fill it than with reading some holiday books to get you in the spirit?  Here are some recommendations that are sure to get you excited and keep you entertained  during your winter break!

cover shot for Dash & Lily's Book of Dares by David Levithan

 

Dash & Lily's Book of Dares  by David Levithan and Rachel Cohn

 Told in the alternating voices of Dash and Lily, two teens who carry on a winter  scavenger hunt in Christmas-time New York. 

 

   

 

 

Cover image for Let It Snow by John Green, Maureen Johnson and Lauren Myracle

 

Let It Snow by John Green, Maureen Johnson and Lauren Myracle

In three intertwining short stories, several high school couples experience the trials and tribulations along with the joys of romance during a Christmas Eve snowstorm in a small town.

 

 

 

 

cover image for Wintertown by Stephen Emond

 

Winter Town by Stephen Emond

Evan and Lucy, childhood best friends who grew apart after years of seeing one another only during Christmas break, begin a romance at age seventeen but his choice to mindlessly follow his father's plans for an Ivy League education rather than becoming the cartoonist he longs to be, and her more destructive choices in the wake of family problems, pull them apart.

 

 

 

A Christmas Carol by Charles Dickens

A miser learns the true meaning of Christmas when three ghostly visitors review his past and foretell his future

 

 

 

 

Cover image for Jingle Boy by Kieran Scott

 

Jingle Boy by Kieran Scott

In this electronic book, sixteen-year-old Paul Nicholas, long a Christmas-tradition keeper, is beginning to understand why his best friend hates the holiday season.

 

 

 

Have fun reading and enjoy your holidays!

Military Teen Fiction

Dena's picture

Today is Veteran's Day, a day that America honors those men and women who currently serve, and have served, in the US military. Two of the most important people in my life served in the military: my grandmother, who served on the WAVES during WWII and taught men how to fly planes, but because she was a woman she wasn't actually allowed to fly them herself; and my husband, who served on the USAF for 20 years, during which he engaged in three wars and a number of insurgencies around the world, often in combat. 

Here at the library we get a number of teens who are curious about the military, and are interested in reading both fiction and non-fiction books about life as a soldier. Need some suggestions? Here ya' go! 

Soldier Doll by Jennifer Gold  I know, you're thrown by the fact that this is about a doll; don't be. The soldier doll is simply used to guide the reader through a number of wars, and to introduce us to the lives of the soldiers and civilians effected, and as a symbol–for hope, or death, only the reader can decide. 

 

The Right Fight by Chris Lynch  Readers who like to read about WWII will enjoy the newest Chris Lynch,  about a young man who is drafted immediately before the beginning of WWII and sent to the North African campaign. 

 

Violins of Autumn by Amy McAuley  Fans of spy novels will enjoy this WWII fiction about 17-year-old Betty who parachutes into German-occupied France to join the underground Resistance as a spy. 

 

Dirt Bikes, Drones, and Other Ways to Fly by Conrad Wesselhoeft  This book is awesome; it is actually on my Mock Printz list. Arlo Santiago lives life a moment at a time. His sister is slowly dying of a debilitating disease, and he and his family are still grieving over the death of his mother. To settle his mind he rides dirt bikes and plays drone warfare video games, both very well. So well in fact that the US military have taken notice and want him to fly real drones. 

 

 

 

Photography Now and Then

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Want to take a picture? It's simple, right. You just pull out your phone and snap, it's done. Well, photography hasn't always been so easy. In the early days of photography, people had to hold completely still for up to 10 minutes. That's probably why no one is ever smiling in the photos. Then the image had to be processed with casutic chemicals in an extremely dark room. Photography was a time-comsuming, expensive process that often lead to more failed images than successful ones.  

In a new biography of one of the first professional female photographers,  Stand There! She Shouted  by Susan Goldman Rubin, we learn how Julia Margaret Cameron turned failure (fuzzy, slightly out of focus photos) into a trademark style. Many of her photographs now hang in the Victoria and Albert Museum in England, the Art Institute of Chicago, and the Metropolitan Museum of Art in New York. Often using family members as her subjects, a portrait of her great-niece Rachel Gurney taken in 1872 entitled “I Wait” is among one of Cameron's most recognized images.

"I Wait" by Julia Margaret Cameron (1872)

 

 

 

 

 

 

Check out these titles to learn more about how photographs have impacted history and how to take awesome photos of your life and times.