Little Kids @ UAPL

Get Ready To Read! Letter Knowledge

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At some point in early childhood, children realize that letters are different from each other. They learn to recognize all letters, in both lower and upper cases. They learn the name of each letter and what sound accompanies each letter. This process is known as letter knowledge. This skill can be developed by every day reading and writing activities such as playing with alphabet letters on a refrigerator, reading and pointing out letters in alphabet books, naming letters on signs at the grocery store and even tracing letters on a dry erase board. This short video shows just how easy it is to fit this into any busy parent's schedule:

 

Try this fun idea! You can make your very own magnetic letter board. Just spray a cookie sheet a fun color and add magnetic letters!

The UAPL has a wonderful collection of alphabet books. Check these out:

Get Ready To Read! Vocabulary

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Vocabulary is simply knowing the names of things. Words and their meanings are the building blocks of literacy development. The more words a child knows, the easier it will be for him or her to understand what they read.  A parent can help their child build vocabulary by exploring different types of books, formats, and subjects in both fiction and non-fiction. As unfamiliar words are encountered, the parent and the child can sound them out together and talk about what each new word means. At home, parents can introduce new words into every day conversation. For example, instead of the usual, “Get in the car, we're going to the library!” you could say, “Let's get into our automobile (or vehicle)!” 

Enjoy these books from our collection, chosen especially for their colorful vocabulary:

Get Ready To Read! Print Awareness

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Print awareness is noticing print everywhere! Print awareness is knowing that the squiggly lines on a page symbolize something meaningful. Print awareness is the knowledge that writing in English is read from left to right and that the text flows from the top of the page to the bottom. Another aspect of print awareness is being familiar with how a book works; that books have covers, and pages to be turned, left to right. 

Helping your child develop this skill is easier than you think. Watch this video for some at-home tips:

Why not make your own book at home? You and your child can make up and write your own story,  practice writing their name, or may be even paste photos of friends and family. Make a point to design the cover, come up with a title, and don't forget to add the author's name!!

 

Do You Think It's Easy Being the Tooth Fairy?

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Do you think it's easy being the Tooth Fairy? All those teeth and so little time! If your child is entering the stage of losing teeth we have plenty of books to help them through the transition. Stop in the Youth Department and ask a Librarian to get you started on some great books, and while you are here be sure to show us your wiggly teeth! 

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