Little Kids @ UAPL

Families and Food

Tracie's picture

When November rolls around, I start thinking about family gatherings, food and good memories. Below are three picture books that explore the themes of family,food and fun. Do you have a favorite picture book about families and food?

Baking Day at Grandma's by Anika Denise

Three little bears set off to Grandma's to help her bake treats for gifts.  This rhyming story has sweet pictures and a recipe for Chocolate Cake.

 

 

All for Pie Pie for All by David Martin

A cat family bakes and eats a delicious pie.  The crumbs they leave feed, in turn, a family of mice and a family of ants.  A nice look at how even a little can go a long way.

 

 

The Relatives Came by Cynthia Rylant

The setting for this story is the summer season, but the loving gathering will ring true all year. 

Last Minute Halloween Ideas

Katie's picture

It’s that time of year again!  Can you believe that it is already time to Trick or Treat?  It may be hard to believe with this heat wave, but Trick or Treat is on Thursday!!  If you don’t have your costume yet, don’t worry–there is still time.  

A great go-to is the classic ghost.  Just find an old sheet with holes in it for eyes.

Or, just wear all black and tie a shirt around your head like in the picture below with a scarf around your waist.  Ta-da! You’re a ninja.

If you really want to be comfy, you can wear your pajamas and a fluffy pair of slippers.  All you need to do is grab a TV remote and you are a couch potato.  (Just make sure you ask an adult for an extra remote, otherwise it will be hard to watch cartoons the next morning in case it gets dropped while out Trick or Treating!)

If none of those ideas work, below are some books that have good, quick costume ideas!

**Remember, if all else fails, you can always wear your regular clothes and when someone asks you what your costume is, you can reply, “I’m dressed as a muggle, from Harry Potter!”

Not-So-Scary Monsters

Sue's picture

Cover for Monsters Love Colors bookHave you heard about the monsters who love colors? Or the monsters who love to play on the playground? Do you like silly monster stories that aren't too scary? Try these titles for some silly adventures full of furry monsters. Most of the monsters in these stories aren't scary, but reading about them can still make you feel a bit braver. 

 

Read Your Way Through Africa

Dana's picture

With the new Heart of Africa exhibit opening this week at the Columbus Zoo and Aquarium it might be time to do a little research into the animals and country from that exotic land.  Whether it's some fun fiction or interesting facts, reading up on the subject could enhance your next trip to the zoo or at least get your little ones excited for the amazing animals they are about to see. Below you will find some selections that are sure to please even the youngest patrons! 

For more information about the new Heart of Africa exhibit visit http://heartofafrica.columbuszoo.org

Introducing Africa by Chris Oxlade

African Animals ABC by Beverley Joubert

​We All Went on Safari by Laurie Krebs

Oh Dear, Geoffrey! by Gemma O'Neill

African Critters by Robert Haas

Adventures of Riley: Safari in South Africa by Amanda Lumry

Get Ready To Read! Building Narrative Skills

Youth Department's picture

Mother and baby readingToday’s children are expected to have strong pre-literacy skills before they enter kindergarten. How can parents ensure that they are providing the right experiences for their children to develop these skills? Many parents don’t realize that literacy education actually begins in infancy. 

The good news is that helping your child attain such skills is much easier than you may think. Almost ANY activity that you do with your child is helping them develop literacy skills. It can be as simple as talking and singing to your child, reading to them, or even describing to them what they are feeling, hearing, tasting, touching, seeing and doing.

One simple activity to start with is looking at pictures.  Look at family photos, or pictures from books and magazines and talk about what you see. Better yet, check out some of the UAPL’s wordless picture books. Snuggle up in your favorite comfy chair, look at the pictures and make up your own stories! This activity helps your child develop narrative skills.  We have many wordless books, but some of our favorites are:

 

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