Little Kids

Get Ready To Read! Letter Knowledge

Youth Department's picture

At some point in early childhood, children realize that letters are different from each other. They learn to recognize all letters, in both lower and upper cases. They learn the name of each letter and what sound accompanies each letter. This process is known as letter knowledge. This skill can be developed by every day reading and writing activities such as playing with alphabet letters on a refrigerator, reading and pointing out letters in alphabet books, naming letters on signs at the grocery store and even tracing letters on a dry erase board. This short video shows just how easy it is to fit this into any busy parent's schedule:


Try this fun idea! You can make your very own magnetic letter board. Just spray a cookie sheet a fun color and add magnetic letters!

The UAPL has a wonderful collection of alphabet books. Check these out:

Check out these award winners!

Laura's picture

Yesterday, the American Library Association announced the winners of the best children’s and teen books published in 2013.   Copies of all these wonderful books can be reserved in our catalog.

If you like well-illustrated books, check out the Caldecott winner, “Locomotive” by Brian Floca. 

The Newbery award for outstanding writing went to “Flora & Ulysseys: the illuminated adventures” by Kate DiCamillo.

Parrots Over Puerto Rico” by Susan L. Roth was recognized with the Robert F. Sibert Informational Award.

Beginning readers should check out “Watermelon Seed” by Greg Pizzoli, the winner of the Theodore Seuss Geisel Award.

For the complete listing of awards, their winners, and honor books, visit ALA’s website. (

Read a Geisel Award Winner

Sue's picture

The Geisel Award is given each year to the “author and illustrator of the most distinguished American book for beginning readers.” This award is named after Theodor Seuss Geisel, aka Dr. Seuss.

In honor of Dr. Seuss's birthday on March 2, here are some Geisel Award winners for you to try, including the 2015 winner!

Get Ready To Read! Vocabulary

Youth Department's picture

Vocabulary is simply knowing the names of things. Words and their meanings are the building blocks of literacy development. The more words a child knows, the easier it will be for him or her to understand what they read.  A parent can help their child build vocabulary by exploring different types of books, formats, and subjects in both fiction and non-fiction. As unfamiliar words are encountered, the parent and the child can sound them out together and talk about what each new word means. At home, parents can introduce new words into every day conversation. For example, instead of the usual, “Get in the car, we're going to the library!” you could say, “Let's get into our automobile (or vehicle)!” 

Enjoy these books from our collection, chosen especially for their colorful vocabulary:

Creatures of the Night

Sue's picture

Have you ever taken a “night walk” with a flashlight? It’s fun to discover all the things that are just waking up when we’re getting ready for bed. Nocturnal creatures such as badgers, bats, foxes, owls, insects and many more are usually awake and most active during the night. Check out the books below for stories about a variety of creatures that come out at night as well as a fun guessing rhyme for caregivers and children to share. 

Try this guessing rhyme with your little ones, too!

Rhyming Activity - There's Something in the Nighttime (Credit: SLC Book Boy)

There's something in the nighttime

That I can't really see

There's something in the nighttime,

Now what can it be?

Whoo, whoo

Hear its funny sound

Whoo, whoo

An owl is what I found!

(Continue the rhyme with other night animals and the sounds they might make!)





Subscribe to Little Kids