Big Kids

Great Books for Newly Independent Readers

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Scholastic has a new early chapter book series called Branches. These books are great for newly independent readers with high-interest content and illustrations on every page. Some books are formatted as early chapter books while some have more of a graphic-novel feel. There are thought bubbles, graphic panels, and funny pictures to keep your young reader engaged. The levels vary but are generally intended for readers in kindergarten through third grade.  I love to recommend these to parents who are looking for a a begining chapter book for a child just ready to take a step away from early readers. To find specific levels and a list of all the series you can visit the Scholastic website at http:// www.scholastic.com/branches/ or click on the links below to reserve a copy today!  

 

Spirit Animals!

Sue's picture

Do you like the 39 Clues books? If so, you might want to try a new series called Spirit Animals. Just like the 39 Clues, each book will have a different author and you can join in the adventure online.  

In Spirit Animals: Book 1 Wild Born, four young heroes discover the special connection they each have with a wild animal and set out on a dangerous quest to save the world of Erdas.  

Want to know more about it? Watch this video of Brandon Mull, the author of Book 1, or visit the Scholastic website and create your hero and summon a spirit animal of your own!

 

Picture Book Selection for Travelers

Adele and her brother Simon are coming to America from France to visit their Aunt Cecile, who takes them on a train trip to see the United States!  Simon is more interested in seeing all of the sights than in keeping track of his belongings, which become lost from New York City to San Francisco.  See if you can find what Simon lost in each picture.  The detailed drawings and sweet story will delight readers of all ages, but particularly those ages 4-8. 

Curious?

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Ever wonder what the smelliest fruit on the planet might be? Do you know what country serves fried grasshoppers as a common snack? Did you know that the eye muscle is the strongest muscle in the body? You can find even more curiosities in books such as That's Awesome! The World's Most Amazing Facts & Records.  Inquisitive minds (or reluctant readers) can satisfy their curious cravings for the strange, mysterious, outrageous, weird, freaky or just plain gross with some of these book suggestion from the Youth Department at UAPL

Picture Perfect Science

Laura's picture

With the implementation of the new Common Core standards, educators and parents are realizing the importance of integrating literature and science.  Picture books are a wonderfully interactive way to introduce young children to the many diverse fields of scientific inquiry.

In Counting on Frank by Rod Clement, a boy and his dog ask questions about the ordinary things all around us.  Lisa Wheeler’s book, The Pet Project: cute and cuddly vicious verses, illustrates the value of the scientific method as a problem-solver. 

Picture books investigate specific scientific principles too.  Ever wonder why some things float and some things sink?  Archie the goat and his friend Skinny the hen use Archimedes’ principle to find out what floats in a moat

Visit either of these websites for more picture perfect stories.

Audiobooks Read by the Author

Sarah's picture

Living on the east side, my commute gives me plenty of time in the car to listen to music, the news, and, most enjoyably, audiobooks!  I have found that I particularly like audiobooks that are read by the author.  Below are some youth and young adult titles that are on my read or to-read lists:

Picture Books & Easy Readers:

Juvenile Chapter Books:

Teen Books:

What Are You Thankful For??

Youth Department's picture

It's that time again, kids. Time to hug smelly old Aunt Matilda (why does she have to wear SO MUCH perfume?), time for your mom to harp at you in front of everyone, to eat your brussels sprouts, time to fill your stomach to almost bursting, time to fight your little brother for the last piece of pumpkin pie, time to let Great Grandma squeeze your cheeks and drone on about how much you've grown, time for the wish bone to be broken (what are you wishing for?), and time for turkey!!

IT'S TIME TO GET THANKFUL!!

No, really…seriously… we really do have a lot to be thankful for. Here at the UAPL, you can fill out a feather for our bulletin board turkey, and tell us what you are thankful for. Some of the things our patrons are thankful for are dinosaur books, ice cream, mommy & daddy, food and love. The answers are as varied as our wonderful patrons. At the UAPL, we are thankful for you. We are thankful that you allow us to help you find books that you love, thankful that you love to read and use our services and facilities. Have a great Thanksgiving! If you are in the mood to read books about Thanksgiving, give these a try:

Amazing Butterflies

Renee's picture

Looking for an idea for a family outing that is fun and educational? Check out the  Franklin Park Conservatory and Botanical Garden's newest interactive family exhibit “ Amazing Butterflies” which opened May 17th. To help prepare for your visit check out some of our books about the life cycle of a butterfly.

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