Big Kids

Summer Sloth

Laura's picture

sloth

Feeling lazy this summer?  Consider these fun facts about the world's slowest animal – the sloth.

  • 1. Sloths can sleep from 15-20 hours per day.
  • 2. Sloths only go to the bathroom about once a week.
  • 3. Some sloths can turn their heads almost all the way around.
  • 4. Sloths might not run, but they are very good swimmers.
  • 5. Two-Toed sloths actually have 3 toes on each back leg.

Learn more fun facts or read some wonderful stories about these curious (but extremely cute) creatures.

Cabin Fever! Keeping kids healthy in the cold months.

Renee's picture

As the cold weather approaches keeping kids active and eating healthy can be challenging.  Here are a few ideas to motivate your kids (and maybe the adults) to keep moving, eat healthy and feel great! Here are some great ideas for indoor activities to share with your kids and a few cures for cabin fever. Also, check out the following resources for more great ideas on healthy cooking and exercise for kids.

It's a Fact: Amazing Eyes

Laura's picture

MarmosetDid you know that not every kind of animal has the same type of eyes?   Tigers can see six times better at night than humans.  Owls are the only birds that can see the color blue.  Most hamsters only blink one eye at a time. And, worms have no eyes at all!  Learn about all the unique and interesting types of eyes in Animal Eyes by Mary Holland and Eye to Eye: How Animals See the World by Steve Jenkins.  If your interested in your own eyes, check out Eye: How It Works by David Macaulay.

Just for fun, try tricking your eyes with some books about optical illusions – What in the World: Fun-Tastic Photo Puzzles for Curious Minds by Julie Vosburgh Agnone and X-Treme Illusions by National Geographic Kids.  You can even learn how to make your own optical illusion!

Juvenile Fiction Selection: Audrey (cow)

Audrey is a Charolais cow living a happy and poetic life on Bittersweet farm, that is until the day they take her mother away. Confronted with her new reality, Audrey, with the help of many farm friends, devises an escape plan to avoid her “food cow” fate. Inspired by the true story of Charlene Mookin–aka “Cincinnati Freedom”–this story is a fun adventure for animals lovers of all ages.  

Check out these award winners!

Laura's picture

Yesterday, the American Library Association announced the winners of the best children’s and teen books published in 2013.   Copies of all these wonderful books can be reserved in our catalog.

If you like well-illustrated books, check out the Caldecott winner, “Locomotive” by Brian Floca. 

The Newbery award for outstanding writing went to “Flora & Ulysseys: the illuminated adventures” by Kate DiCamillo.

Parrots Over Puerto Rico” by Susan L. Roth was recognized with the Robert F. Sibert Informational Award.

Beginning readers should check out “Watermelon Seed” by Greg Pizzoli, the winner of the Theodore Seuss Geisel Award.

For the complete listing of awards, their winners, and honor books, visit ALA’s website. (http://www.ala.org/news/press-releases/2014/01/american-library-association-announces-2014-youth-media-award-winners)

Super Power Saturdays - Juvenile Nonfiction: All Kinds of Heroes

Jennifer's picture

Book Cover for Superstars of History by R. J. GrantWelcome to our last month of Super Power Saturdays. So far we have explored a lot of super powers and heroes throughout juvenile books. We've looked at superpowers in fiction in the post What's Your Power?, super powers in graphic novels in Graphic Novels: All Kinds of Powers!, and we explored the unique powers of middle schoolers in Middle School Powers!. But, superheroes and super powers are not limited to fiction. There are real life heroes out there doing amazing things everyday.So, this week's post highlights real life heroes in nonfiction books. Some of these heroes include: animal heroes, first ladies and leaders, explorers and adventurers, inventors, comic book creators, and even everyday children and teens from across the world making a difference. To learn more about these everyday heroes check out some of these picks:

For a list of these and other juvenile nonfiction books about heroes check out the Juvenile NonFiction: All Kinds of Heroes book list in our catalog.

And don't forget to check back in two weeks for our last post in the Super Power Saturdays series where we will feature books that can help you create your own superheroes, graphic novels, and stories in the post Creating Your Own Superheroes and Graphic Novels.

Happy “Super Powered” Reading!

 

Juvenile Fiction Selection: The Princess in Black by Shannon Hale

Princess Magnolia is not your average princess.  She is sipping hot chocolate and enjoying some scones with the Duchess, but then the monster alarms sounds and she becomes The Princess in Black!  When the monsters start threatening the goats, it's up to the Princess to stop them, along with the help of her trusty stead, Frimpepants.  Princess Magnolia, disguised in black, sets off to save the kingdom.  Can she stop the monsters and keep the nosy duchess from discovering her secret identity?  This is a fun read for any child who loves princesses with a little less frill and a little more adventure!  (Grades K-3 School Library Journal)

Vacation! Home or Away?

Stephanie's picture

School is almost out for the summer!  HOORAY!  Many families decide to start the summer break somewhere far away, perhaps at the beach, or in the mountains.  There are still others who decide to have a “stay-cation”.   Try these favorites for your summer reading!

First-in-the-Series Books

Sarah's picture

I love discovering new series in our juvenile fiction collection, and here are two that I thoroughly enjoyed this year:

To learn more about these books, please visit their authors' websites: Turnage or Federle.

You are also welcome to stop by any UAPL location to find these and other first-in-the-series books in our juvenile fiction collection.  At Miller Park, look for them on top of the shelves in the youth area!

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