Big Kids

Juvenile Fiction Selection: Space Case by Stuart Gibbs

Dash and his family live on the moon.  They are part of the first group of humans to live on Moon Base Alpha and famous on Earth for it.  Sounds exciting right?  Not according to Dash, who is bored out of his mind.  Dash is trapped inside the tiny moon base since kids are not allowed on the surface, and the only thing to do to occupy his time is play virtual reality games.  When Moon Base Alpha's top scientist turns up dead, Dash believes that it might not have been an accident.  Along with new supplies, the supply ship brings some new residents to the base including a new girl Dash's age who he eventually befriends.  Dash becomes convinced Dr. Holtz's death was foul play and begins an investigation into many suspects to solve the mystery.  Each chapter opens with an excerpt from “The Official Residents' Guide to Moon Base Alpha” NASA's instructional guide to living on the moon.  Dash is very clever and the mystery in this story is not only complex but often funny too.  (Grades 3-7 School Library Journal)

Picture Perfect Science

Laura's picture

With the implementation of the new Common Core standards, educators and parents are realizing the importance of integrating literature and science.  Picture books are a wonderfully interactive way to introduce young children to the many diverse fields of scientific inquiry.

In Counting on Frank by Rod Clement, a boy and his dog ask questions about the ordinary things all around us.  Lisa Wheeler’s book, The Pet Project: cute and cuddly vicious verses, illustrates the value of the scientific method as a problem-solver. 

Picture books investigate specific scientific principles too.  Ever wonder why some things float and some things sink?  Archie the goat and his friend Skinny the hen use Archimedes’ principle to find out what floats in a moat

Visit either of these websites for more picture perfect stories.

Audiobooks Read by the Author

Sarah's picture

Living on the east side, my commute gives me plenty of time in the car to listen to music, the news, and, most enjoyably, audiobooks!  I have found that I particularly like audiobooks that are read by the author.  Below are some youth and young adult titles that are on my read or to-read lists:

Picture Books & Easy Readers:

Juvenile Chapter Books:

Teen Books:

What Are You Thankful For??

Youth Department's picture

It's that time again, kids. Time to hug smelly old Aunt Matilda (why does she have to wear SO MUCH perfume?), time for your mom to harp at you in front of everyone, to eat your brussels sprouts, time to fill your stomach to almost bursting, time to fight your little brother for the last piece of pumpkin pie, time to let Great Grandma squeeze your cheeks and drone on about how much you've grown, time for the wish bone to be broken (what are you wishing for?), and time for turkey!!

IT'S TIME TO GET THANKFUL!!

No, really…seriously… we really do have a lot to be thankful for. Here at the UAPL, you can fill out a feather for our bulletin board turkey, and tell us what you are thankful for. Some of the things our patrons are thankful for are dinosaur books, ice cream, mommy & daddy, food and love. The answers are as varied as our wonderful patrons. At the UAPL, we are thankful for you. We are thankful that you allow us to help you find books that you love, thankful that you love to read and use our services and facilities. Have a great Thanksgiving! If you are in the mood to read books about Thanksgiving, give these a try:

Summer Library Club coming soon!

Dena's picture

Our traditional Summer Reading Club is getting an extreme makeover! Here are the details:

Summer Library Club begins earlier than in years past; it will begin on May 26th. 

In addition to the literacy focus, we have added experiential learning “activities” to explore. Participants can choose from 60 activities; activities can be found on the Summer Library Club website, www.summerlibraryclub.org. There is also a shorter list on the back of the reading log, which will be available on the website and can also be picked up here at the library. 

Summer Library Club is for all ages! The program works the same for all ages:

  • Simply sign up either online at www.summerlibraryclub.org, or in person at any UA library. 
  • Log reading hours on your Summer Library Club account online, or in person at any UA library. 
  • After reading 10 hours and completing 10 activities, you have earned your first prize: a stack of great coupons. (Examples of some coupons: $8 off library fines! Free Chipotle meal for teens or kids! And more…)
  • After reading a total of 20 hours and completing a total of 20 activities, you have completed Summer Library Club; you can grab your final prize at any UA library (a free book! We will have a variety of favorite titles, for all ages). You are also automatically entered into the Grand Prize Drawing for your age group. 
  • Summer Library Club ends on Aug 2nd. All hours must be logged by 5 pm on Aug. 2nd to be eligible for the Grand Prize. 

Grand Prizes (winners will be notified by phone on Aug. 3rd):

It's going to be a great summer! See ya soon!

Juvenile Fiction Selection: Beth's Story, 1914 by Adele Whitby

Beth's Story, 1914 is the first installment in the series Secrets of the Manor. Beth is excited for her twelfth birthday when she will receive her great-grandmother's heirloom necklace as a gift, but when the necklace goes missing Beth must learn the secrets of her manor house in order to clear the name of her maid and friend. While searching for answers Beth finds a hidden diary with clues to a much larger family mystery that dates back generations. Historical fiction and mystery collide in this fun new series. (Grades 4-7 School Library Journal)

Amazing Butterflies

Renee's picture

Looking for an idea for a family outing that is fun and educational? Check out the Franklin Park Conservatory and Botanical Garden's newest interactive family exhibit “Amazing Butterflies” which opened May 17th. To help prepare for your visit check out some of our books about the life cycle of a butterfly.

Juvenile Fiction Selection: The Worst Class Trip Ever by Dave Barry

Wyatt Palmer is an eighth-grader at Culver Middle School in Miami, Florida and along with all his classmates is on his way to Washington, DC.  This trip is supposed to be full of museum and monument tours but turns into an adventure that they could never have imagined, and not in a good way.  On the plane from Miami to DC Wyatt's best friend Matt becomes suspicious of the strange men sitting in the seat behind them. Determined to find out what they are up to Matt gets a hold of one of their bags and steals a small box that he thinks might be a detonator.  The boys draw way too much attention to themselves and the strange men, and end up almost getting kicked off the trip and that's just the beginning.  Soon the strange men are in pursuit of them and what they stole.  The boys, with the help of Wyatt's crush Suzana, are in a race to keep themselves from getting caught and stop the two men before they can follow through with their presumed attack on the White House, all while trying to slip under the radar of their teachers.  This is a laugh-out-loud story and will be sure to please even the most reluctant of readers.  (Grades 5-7 School Library Journal)

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