Big Kids

Juvenile Fiction Selection: Audrey (cow)

Audrey is a Charolais cow living a happy and poetic life on Bittersweet farm, that is until the day they take her mother away. Confronted with her new reality, Audrey, with the help of many farm friends, devises an escape plan to avoid her “food cow” fate. Inspired by the true story of Charlene Mookin–aka “Cincinnati Freedom”–this story is a fun adventure for animals lovers of all ages.  

Hold for Ransom

Youth Department's picture

Creepy…weird…disturbing…deranged…quirky…enchanting…spooky. These are all words that readers have used to describe Ransom Rigg's first novel, Miss Peregrine's Home for Peculiar Children. Lucky for us, Mr.Rigg's has recently released the sequel, Hollow City, in which Jacob Portman journeys to London to save the magical world of all things peculiar…well, ya know, maybe you should just watch this book trailer. Be prepared to be totally creeped out!

If you'd like to more about Ranson Riggs, or just some random facts about him (like his favorite word), check out this interview:

Animal Heroes

Sue's picture

Every hero has a story, including many special and remarkable animals. Do you know the story of Balto, a Siberian husky who carried medicine through an Alaskan snowstorm to a town full of sick people? How about Lulu, the kangaroo who saved her human friend after a car accident? Do you like horses? Check out Horse Heroes to learn about some famous horses in history. If you want a book with a little bit of everything, from dramatic rescues to wild and wacky animal adventures, try 125 True Stories of Amazing Animals.  Looking for more stories about furry heroes? Just ask a UAPL staff member for a recommendation (and complete a Summer Library Club activity at the same time!)

 

Juvenile Fiction Selection: The Princess in Black by Shannon Hale

Princess Magnolia is not your average princess.  She is sipping hot chocolate and enjoying some scones with the Duchess, but then the monster alarms sounds and she becomes The Princess in Black!  When the monsters start threatening the goats, it's up to the Princess to stop them, along with the help of her trusty stead, Frimpepants.  Princess Magnolia, disguised in black, sets off to save the kingdom.  Can she stop the monsters and keep the nosy duchess from discovering her secret identity?  This is a fun read for any child who loves princesses with a little less frill and a little more adventure!  (Grades K-3 School Library Journal)

Summer Sloth

Laura's picture

sloth

Feeling lazy this summer?  Consider these fun facts about the world's slowest animal – the sloth.

  • 1. Sloths can sleep from 15-20 hours per day.
  • 2. Sloths only go to the bathroom about once a week.
  • 3. Some sloths can turn their heads almost all the way around.
  • 4. Sloths might not run, but they are very good swimmers.
  • 5. Two-Toed sloths actually have 3 toes on each back leg.

Learn more fun facts or read some wonderful stories about these curious (but extremely cute) creatures.

Cabin Fever! Keeping kids healthy in the cold months.

Renee's picture

As the cold weather approaches keeping kids active and eating healthy can be challenging.  Here are a few ideas to motivate your kids (and maybe the adults) to keep moving, eat healthy and feel great! Here are some great ideas for indoor activities to share with your kids and a few cures for cabin fever. Also, check out the following resources for more great ideas on healthy cooking and exercise for kids.

It's a Fact: Amazing Eyes

Laura's picture

MarmosetDid you know that not every kind of animal has the same type of eyes?   Tigers can see six times better at night than humans.  Owls are the only birds that can see the color blue.  Most hamsters only blink one eye at a time. And, worms have no eyes at all!  Learn about all the unique and interesting types of eyes in Animal Eyes by Mary Holland and Eye to Eye: How Animals See the World by Steve Jenkins.  If your interested in your own eyes, check out Eye: How It Works by David Macaulay.

Just for fun, try tricking your eyes with some books about optical illusions – What in the World: Fun-Tastic Photo Puzzles for Curious Minds by Julie Vosburgh Agnone and X-Treme Illusions by National Geographic Kids.  You can even learn how to make your own optical illusion!

Check out these award winners!

Laura's picture

Yesterday, the American Library Association announced the winners of the best children’s and teen books published in 2013.   Copies of all these wonderful books can be reserved in our catalog.

If you like well-illustrated books, check out the Caldecott winner, “Locomotive” by Brian Floca. 

The Newbery award for outstanding writing went to “Flora & Ulysseys: the illuminated adventures” by Kate DiCamillo.

Parrots Over Puerto Rico” by Susan L. Roth was recognized with the Robert F. Sibert Informational Award.

Beginning readers should check out “Watermelon Seed” by Greg Pizzoli, the winner of the Theodore Seuss Geisel Award.

For the complete listing of awards, their winners, and honor books, visit ALA’s website. (http://www.ala.org/news/press-releases/2014/01/american-library-association-announces-2014-youth-media-award-winners)

Pages

Subscribe to Big Kids