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Mr. Rosenblum Dreams in English by Natasha Solomons

Vita's picture

Mr. Rosenblum is a Jewish refugee who fled to England from Germany before the outbreak of WWII.  He longs to be accepted as a true Englishman.  As a profitable businessman, he buys the correct Savile Row suit, a Jaguar, and shops at Fortnum & Mason.  But his Jewish background prevents his membership into a golf club, for him the ultimate sign of an English gentleman.  In desperation he decides to build his own golf course which proves to be a greater endeavor than anticipated.  The character is exasperating at times, but heartwarming overall, especially when you learn the author is writing about her grandfather.

Vegetable Literacy by Deborah Madison

Catie's picture

Unlike typical cookbooks, Madison organizes her recipes using, “the 12 different families of the animal kingdom”.  In doing so the reader’s eyes are open to the similarities of these vegetables and how to best bring out the flavors of these unique families.  In addition to recipes, this book also contains a wealth of information about each individual vegetable.  Accompanied by stunning photographs, this cookbook is a great way to get fresh ideas for using the vegetables from your summer garden. 

 

How to Cook Without a Book

Kalyn's picture

How to Cook Without a Book is literally changing my life.

Recipes are wonderful, but for years I have been awed by people who can meal-plan and cook from memory without spending hours poring over cookbooks. Most of the time, I don’t trust myself to properly make a pancake, much less prepare a roast, without slavishly finding and following a recipe. I have longed to gain the mysterious knowledge of ingredients and cooking techniques that seem to come so naturally to others.

In How to Cook Without a Book, Pam Anderson provides the answers I’ve been looking for. She equips her readers to cook everything from soups to sautés from heart. She teaches them how to keep a well-stocked fridge and pantry, and even provides memory rhymes that capture the central steps of each cooking technique.

I highly recommend this book to anyone longing for the freedom to cook from the heart instead of from a book. 

"Shine Shine Shine" by Lydia Netzer

Vita's picture

This debut novel centers around a woman born with no hair, her husband who is a prize winning robotics scientist and their autistic son.  As the characters work through a set of unusual circumstances, the main character is reminded that her quest for conventional American “normalcy” has eroded away the things that matter most to her.  This novel is beautifully written and reveals their story in surprising ways.  An extremely engaging book, it ultimately poses the question of whether autism is truly a disorder or an evolution of intellect and adaptation.

Crazy Good: The True Story of Dan Patch, the Most Famous Horse in America by Charles Leerhsen

Vita's picture

Similar to Laura Hilldebrand's Seabiscuit, Leerhsen's tale of Dan Patch is about a horse who loved to run. Few folks are familiar with trotter/pacer racing but a hundred years ago it was more popular than thoroughbred racing. Leerhsen’s story includes the social history of the Ragtime era, small Midwestern farmers, big city con men, and rise of the trotters and pacers popularity into the racing world. Crazy Good: The True Story of Dan Patch, the Most Famous Horse in America is truly an inspiring horse story of an underdog lame colt becoming a superstar champion in racing history. Good read!

 

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