Teen Realistic Fiction: Snow Job

Nick is determined to remake his life after graduating from high school. All he has to do is stick to his list of rules. But, meeting a tough and troubled new girl isn't on his list, and neither is hanging out with Zod, a teenage thug who is back on the streets after Nick testified against him. And, making deliveries for a local drug lord definitely isn't on his list. Will Nick stick to his list and succeed or become just another fall guy?  This is a great story about how one boy attempts to take charge of his destiny.

Juvenile Fiction Selection: The Book Scavenger

Emily and her family are moving again, this time to San Francisco.  Emily loves to play Book Scavenger, an online game with complex puzzles leading to discovering books hidden in places all over the world.  She teams up with new friend James to follow clues in an odd book they find. They want to figure out the secrets before the men who attacked Emily's hero, Book Scavenger publisher Garrison Griswold, solve the mystery or come after the friends.

Parent Recommendation: Big Girls Go Potty and Big Boys Go Potty

Both of these books are told from a kid's point of view, and offer lots of encouragement on the subject of potty training.  An unnamed little girl speaks to the reader, asking about all the big girl things she can do. But, all is not perfect, and the magic of being toilet trained does not happen all at once. Mistakes happen, but mom and dad remain encouraging. These are very optimistic books, and will be useful in the training process.  Recommended for PreK

Unsinkable: A Memoir by Debbie Reynolds

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A youngster during movies ‘Golden Age’, Reynolds writes a wonderfully funny & heartfelt memoir of her trials, tribulations and friendships.  She shares her children, Carrie and Todd Fisher, personal problems, as they struggle with their own successes as well as their famous parents.    Her disastrous marriages brought her to bankruptcy, but she never despaired- and that’s the heart of this story, how her spirit, talent and personality kept her from sinking.

The Real Doctor Will See You Shortly: A Physician's First Year

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What if the mistakes you made at work were life and death? What if forgetting a step didn't mean a customer might get his mocha without espresso but that his brain might begin filling with blood? What if a clumsy moment could mean injecting yourself with a deadly virus?

These are exactly the kinds of scenarios that Dr. Matt McCarthy faces during his first year as a medical intern. In his humorous and transparent memoir of the experience, Dr. McCarthy keeps his readers on the edge of their seats, alternately prompting them to laugh, to cry, and to ponder the deep questions of life.

If you’ve ever wondered what it’s really like to become a doctor, or if you just love a fast-paced, thought-provoking story, this is a book you should read. 

The Kitchen House by Kathleen Grissom

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In 1791, seven-year-old Lavinia, orphaned at sea while emigrating from Ireland with her family, becomes an indentured servant at the ship captain’s Virginia plantation, Tall Oaks. Placed under the care of Belle, the captain’s illegitimate, black daughter, and welcomed into Belle’s slave family, Lavinia starts in the kitchen house learning to cook and clean and then eventually to serve in the big house. Alternately told by Belle and Lavinia, their intertwined stories capture and reflect the hardships of slave life and Lavinia’s struggle to straddle the white and black worlds where her color sets her apart from her slave family and her social class separates her from the big house family. Filled with hardship and resolve, heartbreak and loyalty, and love and sacrifice, Grissom’s debut novel is captivating.


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