Patron Saint of Lost Dogs

Vita's picture

Nick Trout, a veterinarian, writes a delightful story for pet-lovers.  Estranged from his father, the vet pathologist Dr. Mills, returns to his hometown after a fourteen year absence.  His father's much beloved veterinary practice, which he has left his son, is now debt-ridden and about to be taken over by the bank.  Dr. Mills had hoped to sell the business and flee back to his southern retreat, ignoring the past and its memories. Now he’s forced to either give up the business or make an effort to see patients in order to keep it at least temporarily afloat.  That might involve getting too close for comfort.

We Were Liars by E. Lockhart

Vita's picture

Nothing says summer more than a private island, lazy days, and traumatic amnesia. 17 year-old Cadence Sinclair Easton returns to the Sinclair family island after a two-year hiatus, two years in which she was afflicted by debilitating migraines and fragmented memories of an event that happened in the summer of her fifteenth year. The Liars - Cady, her two older cousins, and family friend, Gat – spend the summer piecing together the parts of “Summer 15” that Cady has been missing. What she (and the reader) finds when all the pieces come together is a shocking answer to the mystery and an ending that is as unforgettable for us as it was repellent for her. With luscious storytelling and a poetic sense of memory, Were We Liars will leave you clamoring for the answer from start to finish.

Who is the liar here after all?

The Ocean at the End of the Lane

Colleen's picture

I loved The Ocean at the End of the Lane so much that I read it in one sitting. Returning to his childhood home for a funeral, the unnamed main character begins to recall memories he'd repressed for years. All it takes is a walk down the lane to flood the character with memories of his mysterious childhood friend, Lettie Hempstock, and the frightening but magical adventures they had. The story is thoughtful and intriguing, and encourages the reader to engage in childhood magic and fantasy. 

Juvenile Fiction Selection: The Ogre of Oglefort by Eva Ibbotson

Ivo the orphan, together with the Hag of Dribble, Ulf the Troll, and Brian the Wizard, sets out to save Princess Mirella from the dreaded Ogre of Oglefort. When the rescuers arrive at the castle they are shocked to find that the princess doesn't want to be saved!  In fact, the princess wants the ogre to turn her into a bird so she can escape an arranged marriage. To further complicate matters the Ogre isn't nearly the fearsome creature everyone believed.  He's actually rather depressed. Now the rescuers are going to help save Princess Mirella from her tyrannical royal family and help restore the Ogre and his castle to the fearsome paradise it used to be.  If you're looking for a fun fantasy story with a good sense of humor you will want to pick this book up! (Grades 4-7)

"The Unlikely Pilgrimage of Harold Frye" by Rachel Joyce

Vita's picture

Harold Fyre is retired, henpecked, and indifferent to life.  Then he receives a letter from a elderly friend who is dying.  Rather than mail her correspondence Harold decides to walk 600 miles to deliver his message in person.  His trek is peppered with fascinating characters who help unlock Harold's buried spirit and renew his sense of life. 

The Diving Bell and the Butterfly: A Memoir of Life in Death by Jean-Dominique Bauby, Jeremy Leggatt

Vita's picture

This extraordinary novel was written by Jean-Dominique Bauby, who suffered a stroke leaving him with only movement in his left eye. His writing is poetic and quite wonderful, laced with humor and wit. His imagination was compared to the flight of a butterfly, at the same time feeling his body was a Diving Bell.


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