Adult Recommendations

Playing Dead: A Journey Through the World of Death Fraud

After a particularly frustrating day, writer Elizabeth Greenwood sat down with a friend and griped about her life, her job, and her six-figure student loan debt. After spinning several increasingly unlikely scenarios for paying back her loans, her friend offered, “Or you could fake your own death.”

The conversation moved on, but the idea stuck, leading Greenwood to investigate the who, how, and—especially—why of “pseudocide.” Her search leads her to a gruff skip-tracer, a jet-setting insurance investigator, a middle-aged lothario who managed to disappear in plain sight, and family members left behind. She learns the worst way to fake your death (drowning), the most common reason to fake your death (money), and the quickest way to get caught (keeping your car).

From New York’s Bear Mountain Bridge to Manila’s black-market bodies, Greenwood leads the reader on a wild tour of the world of death fraud, introducing us to death fakers, the people who help them, and the authorities who hunt them. 

The Great Reckoning

Fans of Louise Penny be happy, we are back to Three Pines, Gamache, and everything you love about Penny's novels.

I liked this book and if you have not read a Louise Penny I would highly recommend you start at the beginning with Still Life. You could read this book as a stand alone, but it will unfold better if you are familiar with her characters’ history.

Former Chief Inspector of Homicide at the Surete' of Quebec Armande Ganache doesn’t retire but takes a job at their police academy to root out those who have created a culture of fear and dishonesty. But soon someone at the academy is found dead, killed by a single gunshot to the head. Is it murder or suicide?  And a mysterious map plays into the story line adding another layer of mystification.

Louise Penny is a gifted story teller who makes the setting so real you want to pack up and move there!

Waterloo: The History of Four Days, Three Armies, and Three Battles by Bernard Cornwell

To meet one’s Waterloo” has become a phrase in popular culture meaning a decisive defeat. It's fitting this term has endured because The Battle of Waterloo is considered a history-changing battle. In 1815, Napoleon Bonaparte escaped from the island of Elba, where he had been exiled. He immediately headed to France to reunite the French army, which was always fiercely loyal to him, and to expand the French Empire. Although considered one of the greatest military minds in history, the author indicates Napoleon made some questionable moves and interesting assumptions at Waterloo.

Bernard Cornwell artfully sets the stage for this epic battle and details the events as they unfold. The author’s use of primary sources (letters from the soldiers) gives the reader a vivid account of the brutality of the battle that cost the lives of over 65,000 people. This is an exceptional account that will satisfy anybody with an interest in the Battle of Waterloo.

 

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