Adult Recommendations

The Little Free Library Book by Margret Aldrich

In 2009, Todd Bol built the first Little Free Library in his front yard as a tribute to his mother, a schoolteacher. It was a small, weatherproof box in the shape of a one-room schoolhouse with a simple message: “Take a book, return a book.” Inspired by the positive response of his neighbors, Bol built more libraries, and a grassroots literary movement was born. As of 2015, an estimated 25,000 Little Free Libraries are in operation across the globe—in small towns without a public library and busy cities; in refugee camps and police stations; front yards and local parks. (Locally, Upper Arlington is home to four Little Free Libraries, while nearby Clintonville is home to six.) The Little Free Library Book tells the story of the movement’s beginning and showcases the libraries—and stories—of dozens of library stewards. The book also includes helpful tips and information for those interested in starting their own library.

The Real Doctor Will See You Shortly: A Physician's First Year

What if the mistakes you made at work were life and death? What if forgetting a step didn't mean a customer might get his mocha without espresso but that his brain might begin filling with blood? What if a clumsy moment could mean injecting yourself with a deadly virus?

These are exactly the kinds of scenarios that Dr. Matt McCarthy faces during his first year as a medical intern. In his humorous and transparent memoir of the experience, Dr. McCarthy keeps his readers on the edge of their seats, alternately prompting them to laugh, to cry, and to ponder the deep questions of life.

If you’ve ever wondered what it’s really like to become a doctor, or if you just love a fast-paced, thought-provoking story, this is a book you should read. 

Romantic Outlaws: the Extraordinary Lives of Mary Wollstonecraft and Her Daughter Mary Shelley by Charlotte Gordon

Mary Wollstonecraft and her daughter Mary Shelley never knew each other.  Mary W. died giving birth to her daughter Mary Shelley.  Yet both women similarly defied convention, both became famous writers; both fell in love with brilliant but impossible authors; both were single mothers and had children out of wedlock; both broke out of the rigid conventions of their era and lived in exile; and both played important roles in the Romantic era during which they lived.

Gordon’s book examines each in alternating chapters of the two women's lives.  This might sound confusing to the reader but it is not.  She presents the facts of each woman's life in a fascinating way that feels as if this biography is a novelization.  Highly readable, highly recommended.

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