Adult Recommendations

Pollinator Friendly Gardening by Rhonda Fleming Hayes

The severe decline in the populations of two pollinators, Monarch butterflies and honey bees, has brought them to the forefront of media and public attention. Most of the other pollinators, however, continue to toil away with little to no notice or respect. To change people’s mindset about “bugs,” Hayes discusses the primary pollinators from honey and native bees to butterflies, moths, flies, wasps and beetles to non-insect pollinators—birds and bats. Topics covered include using native versus “alien” plants and nativars (cultivars of native plants), enhancing pollinator habitats, sustaining butterflies with larval host plants, allowing nesting sites for bees, providing liquids and shelter, and protecting pollinators while controlling pests. For inspiration and practical know-how from an easy-to-understand, non-judgmental source, this book is an excellent resource.

The Brotherhood of the Wheel by R.S. Belcher

Lurking in a forgotten town in the middle of America, an ancient evil is preparing a new attack on humanity. Our only hope of survival rests in the hands of an unlikely trio: long-haul trucker Jimmy Aussapile; Heck Sinclair, the heir-apparent of a bounty-hunting biker gang; and rogue Louisiana cop Lovina Hewitt. With the help of an ancient order of knights and a certain back-from-the-dead rockstar nicknamed “Helvis” (but don’t call him that to his face), our heroes will fight urban legends brought to fanged-and-clawed life, pagan gods gone bad, and a club of serial killers.

The Brotherhood of the Wheel is an exciting new urban fantasy that breathes diesel fumes and fresh life into the genre.

The Waters of Eternal Youth by Donna Leon

Commissario Guido Brunetti is back solving crime.  The Venetian inspector has been called on to investigate an attempted murder.  The case is over a decade old and has been filed as an accident.  If this isn’t enough of an obstacle, let’s throw in office politics, inept superiors, and the beautiful but overly touristic and corrupt city of Venice as the setting.  Leon delivers a tight, elegant mystery devoid of car chases, most weapons, and limited cell phone use.