Adult Recommendations

How to Cook Without a Book

How to Cook Without a Book is literally changing my life.

Recipes are wonderful, but for years I have been awed by people who can meal-plan and cook from memory without spending hours poring over cookbooks. Most of the time, I don’t trust myself to properly make a pancake, much less prepare a roast, without slavishly finding and following a recipe. I have longed to gain the mysterious knowledge of ingredients and cooking techniques that seem to come so naturally to others.

In How to Cook Without a Book, Pam Anderson provides the answers I’ve been looking for. She equips her readers to cook everything from soups to sautés from heart. She teaches them how to keep a well-stocked fridge and pantry, and even provides memory rhymes that capture the central steps of each cooking technique.

I highly recommend this book to anyone longing for the freedom to cook from the heart instead of from a book. 

The Little Free Library Book by Margret Aldrich

In 2009, Todd Bol built the first Little Free Library in his front yard as a tribute to his mother, a schoolteacher. It was a small, weatherproof box in the shape of a one-room schoolhouse with a simple message: “Take a book, return a book.” Inspired by the positive response of his neighbors, Bol built more libraries, and a grassroots literary movement was born. As of 2015, an estimated 25,000 Little Free Libraries are in operation across the globe—in small towns without a public library and busy cities; in refugee camps and police stations; front yards and local parks. (Locally, Upper Arlington is home to four Little Free Libraries, while nearby Clintonville is home to six.) The Little Free Library Book tells the story of the movement’s beginning and showcases the libraries—and stories—of dozens of library stewards. The book also includes helpful tips and information for those interested in starting their own library.

The Real Doctor Will See You Shortly: A Physician's First Year

What if the mistakes you made at work were life and death? What if forgetting a step didn't mean a customer might get his mocha without espresso but that his brain might begin filling with blood? What if a clumsy moment could mean injecting yourself with a deadly virus?

These are exactly the kinds of scenarios that Dr. Matt McCarthy faces during his first year as a medical intern. In his humorous and transparent memoir of the experience, Dr. McCarthy keeps his readers on the edge of their seats, alternately prompting them to laugh, to cry, and to ponder the deep questions of life.

If you’ve ever wondered what it’s really like to become a doctor, or if you just love a fast-paced, thought-provoking story, this is a book you should read. 

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