Adult Recommendations

The Ocean at the End of the Lane

I loved The Ocean at the End of the Lane so much that I read it in one sitting. Returning to his childhood home for a funeral, the unnamed main character begins to recall memories he'd repressed for years. All it takes is a walk down the lane to flood the character with memories of his mysterious childhood friend, Lettie Hempstock, and the frightening but magical adventures they had. The story is thoughtful and intriguing, and encourages the reader to engage in childhood magic and fantasy. 

How to Cook Without a Book

How to Cook Without a Book is literally changing my life.

Recipes are wonderful, but for years I have been awed by people who can meal-plan and cook from memory without spending hours poring over cookbooks. Most of the time, I don’t trust myself to properly make a pancake, much less prepare a roast, without slavishly finding and following a recipe. I have longed to gain the mysterious knowledge of ingredients and cooking techniques that seem to come so naturally to others.

In How to Cook Without a Book, Pam Anderson provides the answers I’ve been looking for. She equips her readers to cook everything from soups to sautés from heart. She teaches them how to keep a well-stocked fridge and pantry, and even provides memory rhymes that capture the central steps of each cooking technique.

I highly recommend this book to anyone longing for the freedom to cook from the heart instead of from a book. 

The Little Free Library Book by Margret Aldrich

In 2009, Todd Bol built the first Little Free Library in his front yard as a tribute to his mother, a schoolteacher. It was a small, weatherproof box in the shape of a one-room schoolhouse with a simple message: “Take a book, return a book.” Inspired by the positive response of his neighbors, Bol built more libraries, and a grassroots literary movement was born. As of 2015, an estimated 25,000 Little Free Libraries are in operation across the globe—in small towns without a public library and busy cities; in refugee camps and police stations; front yards and local parks. (Locally, Upper Arlington is home to four Little Free Libraries, while nearby Clintonville is home to six.) The Little Free Library Book tells the story of the movement’s beginning and showcases the libraries—and stories—of dozens of library stewards. The book also includes helpful tips and information for those interested in starting their own library.

Pages